Swing and Line Dance

West Coast Swing

West Coast Swing is a partner dance with roots in Lindy Hop. It is characterized by a distinctive elastic look that results from its basic extension-compression technique of partner connection, and is danced primarily in a slotted area on the dance floor. The dance allows for both partners to improvise steps while dancing together, putting West Coast Swing in a short list of dances that put a premium on improvisation. In practice, West Coast Swing may be danced to almost any music in 4/4 time, and music of many different styles may be found in an evening of West Coast Swing dancing.

Lindy Hop

Lindy Hop is an American social dance, in the Swing dance family. It evolved in Harlem, New York City in the 1920s and ’30s and originally evolved with the jazz music of that time. Lindy was a fusion of many dances that preceded it or were popular during its development, but is mainly based on Jazz, Tap, Breakaway and Charleston. Lindy Hop today is danced as a social dance, as a competitive dance, as a performance dance, and in classes, workshops, and camps. In each, partners may dance alone or together, with improvisation being a central part of the dance.

Line Dances

A Line Dance is a choreographed dance with a repeated sequence of steps in which a group of people dance in one or more lines or rows. Line Dancing is done without Leaders and Followers, with all dancers facing the same direction and executing the steps at the same time. Some Line Dances have lines in which the dancers face each other, or the “line” is a circle, or all dancers in the “line” follow a leader around the dance floor, sometimes while holding the hand of the dancers beside them.